• Electric Yellow Cichlid

    • Electric Yellow cichlid is also called by its other names such as Yellow Lab, Lemon Drop Cichlid, Blue Streak Hap, Labido, Lemon Yellow Lab.
    • This cichlid can grow a bit over 3 inches in length in the wild, but can grow larger in the aquarium, up to a length of almost 4 inches.
    • Like any other Lake Malawi fish, these fishes too live an average of 6 to 10 years.
    • Males of this species can grow a bit larger than females and during breeding time develop a bluish coloration.
    • As the name, The Electric Yellow Cichlid, suggests, it has a bright yellow body also with a black stripe on its dorsal as well as black on the anal fins.
    • The color variation are common, especially blue, are occasionally available.
    • These Cichlids are easy to care for and are a good choice for the beginner hobbyist.
    • They are moderately aggressive and therefore will not be a community tank mate. However, they an be kept with other Cichlids.
    • The Diet of this Cichlids is primarily carnivorous in the wild, but the Electric Yellow Cichlid will adapt to an omnivorous diet in confines of an aquarium. It is not too choosy about its food, and will generally eat all kinds of live, fresh, and flake foods. In order to maintain balanced diet it is recommended to give them with both plant and animal foods in about equal proportions. It is advisable to feed them some vegetable matter to help prevent Malawi bloat. These Cichlids fare better than other Malawi Cichlids and are not as susceptible to Malawi bloat.  They will eat anything like flake foods, pellets, and freeze dried foods as well as natural proteins like brine shrimp and blood worms (either live or frozen).  It is always better to feed them small quantity 3-4 times a day instead of one large feeding. This also keeps the water quality better for a longer period of time.
    • Malawi Cichlids will not do too well under poor water conditions. It is therefore recommended to do frequent water changes.  In the proper setup they will easily adapt to prepared foods and breed readily.  Partial water changes upto 50% a week will be required to be carried out depending on bio load to maintain healthy aquatic conditions.
    • This cichlid has some salt tolerance, therefore can be kept in slightly brackish water conditions but not suited to a full brackish water tank.
    • A minimum 30 gallons tank is recommended for these Cichlids.  However, 50 Gallons would definitely give them adequte room to swim and hide.
    • The filtration system has to be very efficient with strong water movement.
    • The Electric Yellow Cichlid is not considered to be a good community fish. Though they are not territorial by nature but they will be aggressive towards other fish that are similar in body shape or color. These are among the known peaceful Mbuna found on Lake Malawi. They can be made tank mates with other peaceful Mbunas as well as Peacock Cichlids, Featherfins, and Lamprologus species
    • Please visit again to check for the available stock and for size of the fish. Presently this fish is Out Of Stock.
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  • Fantail Goldfish

  • Firemouth Cichlid

    • The body of the Firemouth Cichlid is strongly compressed laterally with a sloping forehead emphasizing a sharply pointed mouth and accented by broad and pointed dorsal and anal fins. They are known to reach up to about 6.5″ (17 cm) in the wild, making them a moderately sized Central American cichlid, though they tend to be a bit smaller in captivity with males reaching about 5″ (12.7 cm) and females about 4″ (10.15 cm). They have a life span of about 10 – 15 years.
    • The eponymous coloring of the Firemouth cichlid presents along the underside of the fish, extending from the mouth along the body to the base of the tail. The rest of the body is generally blue-gray with several black blotches while the fins are a light brown accented with streaks of metallic blue. Note that depending upon where the particular fish came from or where its parentage originated, it may have some slight coloration differences. Males have more pointed dorsal and anal fins and are more intensely colored, especially during breeding. All cichlids, along with some saltwater fish such as wrasses and parrotfish, share a trait of a well-developed pharyngeal set of teeth located in the throat, along with their regular teeth. Cichlids have spiny rays in the back parts of the anal, dorsal, pectoral, and pelvic fins to help discourage predators. The front part of these fins are soft and perfect for precise positions and effortless movements in the water as opposed to fast swimming. Cichlids have one nostril on each side while other fish have 2 sets. To sense “smells” in the water, they suck water in and expel the water right back out after being “sampled” for a short or longer time, depending on how much the cichlid needs to “smell” the water. This feature is shared by saltwater damselfish and cichlids are thought to be closely related.
    • Firemouths are a great choice for the beginner cichlid keeper in part due to their adaptability to a wide variety of environments. Their natural environments tend to vary widely in terms of water conditions, temperature, pH levels, etc, and the same adapatability which allowed them to thrive in so many disparate environments in the wild aids them in being able to similarly thrive in many different types of aquariums. They are extremely easy to feed and will take a variety of foods. They are also a more tolerant and peaceful cichlid and are able to get along well in some types of community tanks.
    • Since they are omnivorousthe Firemouth Cichlid will generally eat all kinds of flake, fresh, and live foods. A varied diet is an important part of keeping your fish in good health, so it is recommended that you provide your fish with a high quality flake food or pellet everyday. In addition, vegetables such as blanched spinanch and cucumber should be offered regularily and meaty foods such as brine shrimp or blood worms should be occasionally offered as a treat.
    • Firemouth Cichlids are fairly easy to care for provided their water is kept clean. Aquariums are closed systems and regardless of size all will need some maintenance. With home aquariums the nitrate and phosphates build up over time and the water hardness increases due to evaporation. Because fish can be sensitive to pollutants and pH instabilty, it is important that at least 15- 20% of the tank water is replaced weekly, especially if the tank is densely stocked. When doing the weekly water changes always use a gravel cleaner to make sure all of the decomposing organic matter that has built up is removed. The majority of of problems that occur with tropical fish tanks usually come down to one cause: decomposing organic matter. When cleaning the tank, scrap view panes of algae but keep a good growth of algae to be used as supplemental food source for the Firemouth.
    • A minimum 30 gallon aquarium is suggested for a pair, though a larger tank would be needed if keeping several. They require good water movement along with strong and efficient filtration. Provide a substrate of fine sand and plenty of hiding places among rocks and wood. Plants are appreciated but should be hardy, such as Sagittaria. Place the plants around the inside perimeter leaving an open area in the center for swimming. These fish enjoying doing a bit of burrowing and rearranging the substrate of the tank, so be sure your plants are potted so as to protect their roots. The Firemouth has some salt tolerance and can be kept in slightly brackish water conditions. However, it is not suited to a fully brackish water tank. It can tolerate a salinity that is about 10% of normal a saltwater tank, a specific gravity of less than 1.0002, though it prefers to live in fresh water.
    • The Firemouth Cichlids can get along fine in a community tank filled with tankmates of similar size as the Firemouth. they are not usually aggressive except when spawning. When spawning they become a bit more aggressive and territorial and will chase off and potentially kill any tankmate they perceive as invading their territory. It is recommended to keep an eye on spawning Firemouths as well as their tankmates and, if necessary, to remove any threatened tankmates. Firemouths are monogamous and like to pair off and form strong nuclear families and are excellent parents to their fry. It is possible to keep more than a single pair of Firemouths, but it is only recommended to do so if their tank is fairly large. They like to burrow and rearrange the substrate, especially when spawning, so keep an eye on your plants to ensure they don’t become uprooted or damaged.
  • Five Colour Cichlid

    • Description : The Five Bar Cichlid is also called by its other names like Tret Cichlid, Tretocephalus Cichlid, Five Barred Lamprologus, Poor Mans Frontosa, Dwarf Frontosa. The Five-Bar Cichlid is a rather stocky elongated fish with a continuous dorsal fin. They have mouths designed for specialized feeding. Their pharyngeal bone is specifically adapted to crush invertebrates, which make up the bulk of their diet. They are relatively small in size reaching a length of only about 4 inches (10 cm) in the aquarium, though they can grow up to almost 6 inches (15 cm) in the wild. The Neolamprologus genus will generally live 8 – 10 years with proper care.
    • They have a very attractive coloration. The body is a light silvery blue to white with five bold black vertical bars. The first bar is behind the head and the last bar is at the base of the caudal fin. The fins are blue with the dorsal fin having just a shadow of the bars extending slightly onto it. The coloring is very close to the Frontosa Cichlid especially when young, thus earning the names “Dwarf Frontosa” and “Poor Mans Frontosa”. It is also similar to the Sexfasciatus or Six-Bar Lamprologus, but the head is less pointed and it has a more slender and torpedo shaped body.
    • All cichlids share a common feature that some saltwater fish such as wrasses and parrotfish have and that is a well-developed pharyngeal set of teeth that are in the throat, along with their regular teeth. Cichlids have spiny rays in the back parts of the anal, dorsal, pectoral, and pelvic fins to help discourage predators. The front part of these fins are soft and perfect for precise positions and effortless movements in the water as opposed to fast swimming.
    • Cichlids have one nostril on each side while other fish have 2 sets. To sense “smells” in the water, they suck water in and expel the water right back out after being “sampled” for a short or longer time, depending on how much the cichlid needs to “smell” the water. This feature is shared by saltwater damselfish and cichlids are thought to be closely related.
    • Size of fish – inches: 5.9 inches (15.01 cm) – The can grow to a length of almost 6″ (15 cm), but more commonly reach just 4″ (10 cm).
    • Lifespan: 8 years – They have a lifespan of 8 to 10 years with proper care.
    • Fish Keeping Difficulty : This is a good fish for the intermediate and experienced cichlid keeper. It is an aggressive cichlid, and not a community tank specimen. It cannot kept with fish other than cichlids. The aquarists must be willing to do frequent water changes and provide appropriate tank mates. It is susceptible to the typical diseases that effect all freshwater fish if the tank is not maintained.
    • Foods and Feeding : Though considered an omnivore,  the Five-Bar Cichlids are primarily carnivorous, feeding on mollusks such as snails along with fishes in the wild. In the aquarium they can be fed flakes and sinking pellets as well as meaty foods, then small feeder fish and feeder snails when they grow larger. Live foods such as baby brine and an occasional garden worm are also fine. Occasionally supplement with their diet with some vegetable based foods as well. Watch water quality. Feed 2 to 5 small pinches of food a day in smaller amounts instead of a large quantity once a day. This will keep the water quality higher over a longer time. A one-day-a-week ‘fast’ can also be beneficial. Of course, all fish benefit from added vitamins and supplements to their foods.
    • Aquarium Care : Do normal water changes of only 10% to 20% a week, or more frequent depending on the nitrite/ammonia levels and stocking numbers. The Lake Tanganyika cichlids cannot handle large water changes very well unless the new water chemistry closely matches the water they are in. This inability to tolerate large water changes is due to Lake Tanganyika being very deep and the water tends to stay stable.
    • Aquarium Setup : The  Five-Bar Cichlid will swim mostly in the middle and bottom areas of the aquarium. A minimum 40 gallon tank is suggested for a fish under 4″. A larger tank that’s 4 feet long and about 80 gallons will be needed for a breeding pair or when keeping a mixed tank. They need good water movement to provide lots of oxygenation along with very strong and efficient filtration. Make sure to have a cover on the aquarium, as this is one species that tends to jump. Lake Tanganyika is a very oxygen rich lake so bubblers need to be going day and night, even if there are plants. Regularly check nitrates and ph, nitrates should be no more than 25 ppm and a pH less than 7 is not tolerated. In addition keep an eye on total hardness and carbonate hardness. Avoid overfeeding and overstocking
    • Social Behaviors : The Five-Bar Cichlid can be kept alone or in pairs, but will be intolerant of other individuals of its species in the tank. They become extremely aggressive and will occupy a large territory when spawning and brooding. Pairs are best kept in a species tank or with fish that can take the abuse they will dish out. They are not as aggressive when not spawning, so juveniles or as a single specimen may not cause a ruckus. Some fish you can try with a pair of these fish are clown loaches,  Rainbow or Redtail Sharks, and large Rainbow fish, Larger Barb, and Larger Danios and other smart and fast moving fish of similar size. Just make sure the tank is very large.
  • Flame Tetras

    • Flame Tetra is also called by other names like Von Rio Tetra, Fire Tetra, Red Tetra.
    • They grow up to 1.6 inches and have a life span of 3-5 years depending upon care and maintenance. this fish is extremely good choice for any beginner hobbyist as it is very robyist and tolerant to wild variety of water condition, it’s a very hardy fish and on account of their exception active nature they are not appropriate choice and tank mates for passive and shy inhabitants as they are constantly on the move and can harass others in the tank which could cause problem in shy varieties of tank mates.
    • They are omnivorous and would eat anything that they are fed twice or thrice a day.
    • Partial water change  of 25-50% every week would be recommended if the tank is not densely stocked.
    • It would be appropriate to have school of 6 or more Flame Tetras in a minimum of 10 gallon aquarium. in case of Flame Tetras more fishes would make them more comfortable. the filtration system needs to be a high quality without creating much water turbulence as these fishes prefer slow water movement.
    • it would be appropriate to keep smaller size fish or larger size fish in the community tank along with Flame Tetras as small fishes may become target of their fin nipping habits and stressed. these fishes are skilled jumpers it would therefore be necessary to secure the aquarium by covering it.
    • The good compatible tank mates are similar size tetras rainbow fish, larger rasboras, barbs and some dwarf cichlid, danios since they are hardy fish in a well maintained aquarium their health would not be of any issue.
  • Frontosa Cichlid

    • Frontosa Cichlid is also called by its other name like Humphead Cichlid. The Frontosa Cichlid is a heavy bodied fish with large rounded heads and a wide underslung mouth. In the aquarium males reach up to about 12 inches (30 cm) in length, with females usually being smaller, reaching about 10 inches (25.4 cm). In the wild they attain lengths of about 14 inches (35 cm), with some resources saying they can reach up to 16 inches (40.6 cm). Both the male and the female will develop the cranial hump on the forehead but the male hump may be larger and more pronounced. The nuchal hump is absent on juveniles. This fish may live 25 years or more with proper care. This cichlid has six or seven broad black stripes on a white background. The fins are white or light blue in color. Variations of this fish found in the more southern parts of Lake Tanganyika were described by Takahashi and Nakaya in 2003 as Cyphotilapia gibberosa. This group is accepted as a new species in the scientific community. They are very similar to the Frontosa Cichlid Cyphotilapia frontosa, but all are noted for having six dark stripes rather than seven. However there is one variant of the original Frontosa Cichlid from the northern area that also has six stripes.
    • Some of the geographic variants include :
    • Burundi Six-stripe Frontosa :
      This variety has a very high body and a large nuchal hump. It has nice banding and although they are not the variety with the most blue, they do have good amount. Inbreeding has resulted in specimens that don’t have the high bodies.
    • Zaire Blue Frontosa :
      This variety is named for the earlier name of the Congo Republic, which was Zaire. This group is has the most blue body, with some even appearing purple, and the band on the head runs between the eyes and down the gill plate. Variations can be solid blue or not, and some will have blue dots on some of the bands.
    • Tanzanian Six-stripe Frontosa :
      This variety is a fairly rare export to the United States. It looks the same as the Burundi Six-stripe and also has a large nuchal hump, but it the two are cross bred the offspring will result in slanted bands.
    • Tanzanian Seven-stripe Frontosa or Frontosa “Kigoma” :
      The Frontosa “Kigoma” is a highly sought after variety. It is readily distinguished by its seventh band that is more of a patch on its face than an actual band. It also has a large nuchal hump that is blue and the dorsal fin has gold accents.
    • Kipili Frontosa :
      The Kipili Frontosa “Tanzania” is variety that is very rarely exported. It has some blue, but not as much as other varieties.
    • Zambian blue Frontosa, or Blue Face Frontosa :
      This variety has has nice banding with some blue on the face. The band on the head fades just above the eye.
    • Samazi Frontosa :
      This variety has a high body, but varies in color between the male and female. The male has nice blues while the female has none or very little. They are also more difficult to breed.
    • Kavalla Frontosa :
      This variety is extremely rare. It has six nice bands and blue accents, but can turn dark with mood. Its dorsal fin is yellow, but with a sheen of multiple colors.
    • This is a great fish for both the intermediate and experienced cichlid keeper. It needs a good sized aquarium and the aquarists must be willing to do frequent water changes and provide appropriate tank mates. In the proper setup it will easily adapt and readily accept prepared foods. It is one of the more peaceful cichlids that can even be kept in a community type setting with other fish of similarly size and temperament, but as it is predatory, it will eat smaller fish.
    • Since they are carnivorous the Frontosa Cichlid will generally eat all kinds of live foods. In the wild they feed on fish and shellfish, such as snails and molluscs. In the aquarium it is a slow feeder and will eat pellets as well as a variety of meaty foods such as feeder fish, worms and crustaceans; ie. mysis, shrimp, and krill. Frozen foods such as brine shrimp is also considered as a good protein source. It is suggested that you do not feed live feeders fish due to possible diseases and pathogens that may be transferred to your fish. All fish benefit from vitamins and supplements added to their foods. Feed 2 to 5 portions of food a day in smaller amounts, instead of a large quantity once a day. This keeps the water quality higher for a longer period of time.
    • Do normal water changes of 10% to 20% a week, or more frequent changes depending on the nitrite/ammonia levels and stocking numbers. The Tanganyika cichlids cannot handle large water changes very well unless the new water chemistry closely matches the water they are in. If a large water change is needed, changing 15% every couple of days should bring water back to normal. This inability to tolerate large water changes is due to Lake Tanganyika being very deep so the water tends to stay stable.
    • The Frontosa Cichlid is active and will swim in all areas of the aquarium. A minimum 70 gallon tank can house a single specimen, but these fish are gregarious and will really do best kept in groups of at least 4 individuals, with 8 to 12 being ideal. A minimum 125 gallon tank will be needed for a small group with a larger aquarium (200 gallons plus) being best for long term care. They need good water movement along with very strong and efficient filtration. Lake Tanganyika is a very oxygen rich lake so bubblers need to be going day and night, even if there are plants. Regularly check nitrates and ph, nitrates should be no more than 25 ppm and a pH less than 7 is not tolerated. In addition keep an eye on total hardness and carbonate hardness. Avoid overfeeding and overstocking. Lake Tanganyika is the second to largest lake in the world, thus contributing to a low fluctuation in temperature and pH. All Tanganyika cichlids need stable temperatures kept within acceptable limits and lots of oxygen to survive. Temperatures under 72° F and over 86° F for too long is not tolerated by many of these fish. When treating for ich, a few days at 86° F is acceptable. The lake is also consistently alkaline with a pH of around 9, and very hard at about 12 – 14° dGH. In the aquarium most Tanganyika cichlids are fairly adaptable as long as conditions are close to these ideal ranges. Most important is that their water chemistry doesn’t change much over time. The water needs to be well buffered and maintained with small, regular water changes.
    • They are fairly non-aggressive community fish. Although the male can be territorial, depending on the individual fish, they may show little tendency to do so. They are gregarious and don’t like being alone. A group of one male with three or more females can be kept together or they can be kept in a group of 8 – 12 individuals. They can be kept in a larger aquarium with other durable fish. But because of their less aggressive temperament, care must be taken that young fish are not seriously harassed in mixed species aquariums. More aggressive Lake Tanganyika or Malawi cichlids do not make good tankmates. Also if kept in a community type environment, the tank mates need to be a pretty good size in relation to the Frontosa Cichlid. This fish is a predator and will eat smaller fishes. Any fish smaller than about 3″ may be at risk of being eaten by an adult.
  • Giant/True Gourami

    • Gouramis broadly fall under to broad category namely dwarf gourami  and large gourami, the primarily different between the two is the size, various varieties exists in each category, namely dwarf gourami, red fire dwarf gourmi, neon blue dwarf gourmi, kissing gourmi,  the sparkling gourmi, Flame dwarf gourmi, pearl gourmi, chocolate gourami, power blue dwarf gourmi, Honey dwarf gourami, gold gourami & Giant Gourmi many of these gouramis are known by other names and you can contact aquasovi for ascertaining the details. the other variety of gourmi is giant gourami which are big in size and completely unsuitable for small or medium tanks.
    • Giant Gouramis are capable of breathing oxygen directly from atmosphere and for this reason they are categorised under labyrinth fish. this makes them highly suitable for aquarium because in case of oxygen level being down in the water, they can gulp care at the surface of the water. you will often notice bubble on the top of the water as is visible in the betta fish, giant gourami are also known by the other names wiz common gourami & true gourmai, for a juvenile giant gourami a 30 gallon tank may be sufficient but ultimately you would need at least 200 gallon tank for the full adult size giant gourmi.
    • on account of its size partial water change requirement is high and you would need to change 50% every week.
    • The average adult size is around 2 feet with proper upkeep these fishes could live beyond 20 years. since these fishes are very hardy and undemanding but on account of its sheer size it is not recommended for beginners but person with some experience in fish keeping.
    • Gouramis are omnivorous and would generally accept any kind of food but it is advised to give them balanced food even vegetable can be offered to them. they are to be fad twice a day.
    • You would need a strong filtration system to counter the bio-load related to this fish, you would need to keep compatible fishes with giant gourami as smaller fishes may be eaten and large and aggressive fishes may stress your giant gouramis.
  • Gold Angel

    • Angel fishes are among-est the popular fishes which are kept by the beginner and long time hobbyist there are numerous varieties on account of natural nutrition which are available for sale in open market. some of the batter known varieties are silver angel fish, zebra, marble angel fish, veil tail angel fish.
    • They can grow up to 6″ in length and therefore require at least 30 gallon tank. they are community fishes but may not  tolerate smaller fish. they can become aggressive as they grow older.
    • They are very sensitive to water changes and therefore strict water parameter have to be maintained while conducting partial water change.  one need to be causes with long finned angel fish as they are prone to fin nipping by variety of fishes.
    • They  are omnivorous and can eat variety of food.
    • Water change of roughly of 20% is required every week to maintain healthy environment.
    • Since they become aggressive as they grow old it is necessary to have have tank mates which would not interfere with the territory maintain by the angel fish. you can comfortably have live plants as they don’t burrow or dig the substrate.
    • They are very sub-stable to ich and skin flukes and parasitic infestation, so it is recommended to keep the water sparkling clean and not allow the decomposing matters to accumulate.
    • The Product fish available is Gold Angel about 2″ in diameter is absolutely healthy.
  • Gold Marble Angelfish

    • Angel fishes are among-est the popular fishes which are kept by the beginner and long time hobbyist there are numerous varieties on account of natural nutrition which are available for sale in open market. some of the batter known varieties are silver angel fish, zebra, marble angel fish, veil tail angel fish.
    • They can grow up to 6″ in length and therefore require at least 30 gallon tank. they are community fishes but may not  tolerate smaller fish. they can become aggressive as they grow older.
    • They are very sensitive to water changes and therefore strict water parameter have to be maintained while conducting partial water change.  one need to be causes with long finned angel fish as they are prone to fin nipping by variety of fishes.
    • They  are omnivorous and can eat variety of food.
    • Water change of roughly of 20% is required every week to maintain healthy environment.
    • Since they become aggressive as they grow old it is necessary to have have tank mates which would not interfere with the territory maintain by the angel fish. you can comfortably have live plants as they don’t burrow or dig the substrate.
    • They are very sub-stable to ich and skin flukes and parasitic infestation, so it is recommended to keep the water sparkling clean and not allow the decomposing matters to accumulate.
    • The Product fish available is Gold Marble Angelfish about 2″ in diameter is absolutely healthy.
  • Golden Discus

    • Origin of Discus Relates to amazon river in South America. The tributaries of river amazon have different color water which are either clear white or black. and areas where these waters mix is the breeding ground of discus.
    • Level of fish keeping of discus is difficult as the fish is very sensitive to quality of water. this fish is not recommended for those who are beginners but with slight care and effort the presence of discus in your aquarium can be very satisfied. broadly the discus can be grouped under 4-5 categories namely green discus, blue discus, brown discus, red spotted discus and Tefe discus. discus fish has often been described as  “King of Aquarium Fishes”. this is because of staining color refined shape and majestic looks, Discus may appear in variety of color and spots and it is often difficult to have exact replica among the verities.
    • These are among-est the expensive tropical fishes. however keeping them can be a very rewarding experience.
    • Adult size of these fishes are normally about 5-7″. but they are capable of going up to 10″.
    • Their life span is around 10 years.
    • Discus are carnivorous and therefore they would enjoy live and frozen food.
    • Minimum of 25% of partial water change is required every week. and while cleaning your tank it is important that you don’t stress your fish as they are very prone to stress related diseases.
    • The minimum water tank required is 60 gallons. The temperature range should ideally be around 82 F and above.
    • These fishes would be compatible with dwarf Cichlids or long loaches. some species of tetra like Cardinal Tetra, Neon Tetra, Rummynose Tetra, Glowlight Tetra, Emperor Tetra, or Congo Tetra, It is advised not to keep angel fishes and cat fishes with discus.
    • The Product fish available is Golden Discus about 2″ in diameter is absolutely healthy
  • Golden Snakeskin Discus

    • Origin of Discus Relates to amazon river in South America. The tributaries of river amazon have different color water which are either clear white or black. and areas where these waters mix is the breeding ground of discus.
    • Level of fish keeping of discus is difficult as the fish is very sensitive to quality of water. this fish is not recommended for those who are beginners but with slight care and effort the presence of discus in your aquarium can be very satisfied. broadly the discus can be grouped under 4-5 categories namely green discus, blue discus, brown discus, red spotted discus and Tefe discus. discus fish has often been described as  “King of Aquarium Fishes”. this is because of staining color refined shape and majestic looks, Discus may appear in variety of color and spots and it is often difficult to have exact replica among the verities.
    • These are among-est the expensive tropical fishes. however keeping them can be a very rewarding experience.
    • Adult size of these fishes are normally about 5-7″. but they are capable of going up to 10″.
    • Their life span is around 10 years.
    • Discus are carnivorous and therefore they would enjoy live and frozen food.
    • Minimum of 25% of partial water change is required every week. and while cleaning your tank it is important that you don’t stress your fish as they are very prone to stress related diseases.
    • The minimum water tank required is 60 gallons. The temperature range should ideally be around 82 F and above.

    • These fishes would be compatible with dwarf Cichlids or long loaches. some species of tetra like Cardinal Tetra, Neon Tetra, Rummynose Tetra, Glowlight Tetra, Emperor Tetra, or Congo Tetra, It is advised not to keep angel fishes and cat fishes with discus.

    • The Product fish available is Golden Snakeskin Discus about 2″ in diameter is absolutely healthy
  • Green Leopard Discus

    • Origin of Discus Relates to amazon river in South America. The tributaries of river amazon have different color water which are either clear white or black. and areas where these waters mix is the breeding ground of discus.
    • Level of fish keeping of discus is difficult as the fish is very sensitive to quality of water. this fish is not recommended for those who are beginners but with slight care and effort the presence of discus in your aquarium can be very satisfied. broadly the discus can be grouped under 4-5 categories namely green discus, blue discus, brown discus, red spotted discus and Tefe discus. discus fish has often been described as  “King of Aquarium Fishes”. this is because of staining color refined shape and majestic looks, Discus may appear in variety of color and spots and it is often difficult to have exact replica among the verities.
    • These are among-est the expensive tropical fishes. however keeping them can be a very rewarding experience.
    • Adult size of these fishes are normally about 5-7″. but they are capable of going up to 10″.
    • Their life span is around 10 years.
    • Discus are carnivorous and therefore they would enjoy live and frozen food.
    • Minimum of 25% of partial water change is required every week. and while cleaning your tank it is important that you don’t stress your fish as they are very prone to stress related diseases.
    • The minimum water tank required is 60 gallons. The temperature range should ideally be around 82 F and above.
    • These fishes would be compatible with dwarf Cichlids or long loaches. some species of tetra like Cardinal Tetra, Neon Tetra, Rummynose Tetra, Glowlight Tetra, Emperor Tetra, or Congo Tetra, It is advised not to keep angel fishes and cat fishes with discus.
    • The Product fish available is Green Leopard Discus about 2″ in diameter is absolutely healthy

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