• Cherry Barb

    • this fish is recommended for beginners as they can be kept in community tanks and is generally peaceful with other tank mates, cherry barb unlike other barbs, tents to be loner and can get stressed sometimes even with its own species, it is not a school fish but it can be kept in group of males or females to get the best out of them. they are shy in nature and would in bearably confined themselves in shaded areas of aquarium. they can grow up to 2″ and have a life span of about 4 years,  they are hardy fish, and great eaters, since they are omnivorous they would not reject any kind of particular food, they can be fed twice or thrice a day.
    • Partial water change  of 25-50% every week would be recommended if the tank is not densely stocked.
    • It would be appropriate to have school of 6 with males and females grouped together. Cherry Barb is best kept in a minimum of 10 gallon aquarium. the filtration system needs to be a high quality without creating much water turbulence as these fishes prefer slow water movement.
    • it would be appropriate to keep smaller size fish with adequate hiding places in the community tank along with Cherry Barb.
    • The good compatible tank mates are similar fishes.
  • Chocolate Angelfish

    • Angel fishes are among-est the popular fishes which are kept by the beginner and long time hobbyist there are numerous varieties on account of natural nutrition which are available for sale in open market. some of the batter known varieties are silver angel fish, zebra, marble angel fish, veil tail angel fish.
    • They can grow up to 6″ in length and therefore require at least 30 gallon tank. they are community fishes but may not  tolerate smaller fish. they can become aggressive as they grow older.
    • They are very sensitive to water changes and therefore strict water parameter have to be maintained while conducting partial water change.  one need to be causes with long finned angel fish as they are prone to fin nipping by variety of fishes.
    • They  are omnivorous and can eat variety of food.
    • Water change of roughly of 20% is required every week to maintain healthy environment.
    • Since they become aggressive as they grow old it is necessary to have have tank mates which would not interfere with the territory maintain by the angel fish. you can comfortably have live plants as they don’t burrow or dig the substrate.
    • They are very sub-stable to ich and skin flukes and parasitic infestation, so it is recommended to keep the water sparkling clean and not allow the decomposing matters to accumulate.
    • The Product fish available is Chocolate Angelfish about 2″ in diameter is absolutely healthy.
  • Clown Angelfish

    • Angel fishes are among-est the popular fishes which are kept by the beginner and long time hobbyist there are numerous varieties on account of natural nutrition which are available for sale in open market. some of the batter known varieties are silver angel fish, zebra, marble angel fish, veil tail angel fish.
    • They can grow up to 6″ in length and therefore require at least 30 gallon tank. they are community fishes but may not  tolerate smaller fish. they can become aggressive as they grow older.
    • They are very sensitive to water changes and therefore strict water parameter have to be maintained while conducting partial water change.  one need to be causes with long finned angel fish as they are prone to fin nipping by variety of fishes.
    • They  are omnivorous and can eat variety of food.
    • Water change of roughly of 20% is required every week to maintain healthy environment.
    • Since they become aggressive as they grow old it is necessary to have have tank mates which would not interfere with the territory maintain by the angel fish. you can comfortably have live plants as they don’t burrow or dig the substrate.
    • They are very sub-stable to ich and skin flukes and parasitic infestation, so it is recommended to keep the water sparkling clean and not allow the decomposing matters to accumulate.
    • The Product fish available is Clown Angelfish about 2″ in diameter is absolutely healthy.
  • Comet Goldfish

    • Comet Goldfishes are related to the Koi fish. and have their origin from common gold fish and on account of their brilliance and delightful activity they are preferred by all fish keepers. They are one of the most readily available aquarium fishes and they come in radish orange colors and are available in yellow, orange, white, red. they are easier to hand and can acclimatized easily to aquarium condition. they are not choosy about their choice of food. however one thing to be bond in mind is most fresh water aquarium fishes are tropical but gold fish are cold water fish. they can be maintained with heater or filter as long as water parameter are kept within range. they can also make good pond fish and they get along with Koi carp.
    • These Comet Gold fish can grow up to 4″ in length and are peaceful in nature. the average life span over 10 years
    • Goldfish produced lots of waste and frequent water change is recommended.
    • they are omnivorous and would generally accept all kind of food it would be appropriate to feed them twice or thrice day. keeping in mind that the food is consumed with in three to five minutes and any extra food is removed. this rule of removing the extra food is applicable in most variety of aquarium fishes but in case of Comet Golf Fish over feeding could adversely affect their health.
    • Partial water change of 25% every week would be recommended if the tank is not densely stocked.
    • Filtration system recommended by aquasovi is primarily biological filtration system which would infuse lot of oxygen and expedite the braking down of harmful substances in the water. rapid fluctuation of water temperature can be fatal to gold fish. and it is recommended to keep  gold fish in minimum 15 gallon tank.
    • The thumb rule of fish keeping is one inch per gallon of water has to be strictly adhered  in aquarium with gold fish.
    • It is advisable to have gravel substrate to create a natural and beneficial environment for the Comet goldfish.
    • Comet gold fish can do well in community aquarium as it enhances the aesthetic value of your tank but is also a good scavenger. you need not add others scavenger or bottom feeder to your tank if you have Comet gold fish. they go well with peaceful and non aggressive types.
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    Common Gold Fish

    • Common Gold Fish are related to the Koi fish. and on account of their brilliance and delightful activity they are preferred by all fish keepers. They are one of the most readily available aquarium fishes and they come in solid colors and combinations of white, yellow, orange, red , brown and black. they are easier to hand and can acclimatized easily to aquarium condition. they are not choosy about their choice of food. however one thing to be bond in mind is most fresh water aquarium fishes are tropical but gold fish are cold fish. they can be maintained with heater or filter as long as water parameter are kept within range. they can also make good pond fish and they get along with Koi carp.
    • These gold fishes can grow up to 4″ in length and peaceful in nature. the average life span over 10 years but there have been certain instances of gold fishes living beyond 20 years also. the important factor while maintaining the gold fish is that over covering has to be avoided. and they could grow over 12″ if species environment is given. they are very similar to comet fish and are often confused with it. the difference been the comet goldfish have a longer tin fins. and there radish orange in color whereas common gold fish toward in gold color. gold fishes is differ in sizes also with common gold fish being longer or larger. another fish which is capable of being confused with common gold fish is shubunkin gold fish, Calico Goldfish, Speckled Gold Fish, Harlequin Goldfish. The only different between calico gold fish is coloration they can have a different color pattern as comparative common gold fish.
    • Goldfish produced lots of waste and frequent water change is recommended.
    • they are omnivorous and would generally accept all kind of food it would be appropriate to feed them twice or thrice day. keeping in mind that the food is consumed with in three to five minutes and any extra food is removed. this rule of removing the extra food is applicable in most variety of aquarium fishes but in case of Golf Fish over feeding could adversely affect their health.
    • Partial water change  of 25% every week would be recommended if the tank is not densely stocked.
    • Filtration system recommended by aquasovi is primarily biological filter system which would infuse lot of oxygen and expedite the braking down of harmful substances in the water. rapid fluctuation of water temperature can be faded to gold fish. and it is recommended to keep  gold fish in 15 gallon tank.
    • The thumb rule of fish and gallon that is one inch in length of fish in one gallon water has to be strictly adhere in aquarium with gold fish.
    • It is advisable to have grable subtract to create a nature and beneficial environment for the goldfish.
    • gold fish can do well in community aquarium as it enhance the aesthetic value of your tank but is also a good scavenger you need not add others scavenger or bottom feeder to your tank if you have gold fish. they go well with peaceful and non aggressive types.
  • Convict Cichlid

    • Convict Cichlid are called by its other names like Pink Convict Cichlid, Zebra Cichlid, White Convict Cichlid. The Convict Cichlid has a stocky oval disk shape, with pointed anal and dorsal fins. This is one of the smaller Central American cichlids, with the males only reaching 5 – 6″ (13 -15 cm) in length and females a bit less at 3 – 4″ (8 -10 cm). They are also very deep bodied so it’s easy to underestimate their actual size. They have a general life span of 8 – 10 years, though there have been reports of individuals living up to 20 years. This cichlid has a blue-gray, cream, or blue-lavendar base on the body with 8 to 9 dark vertically running bands. They have a break in the vertical bands in the area behind their head, almost forming a “U” shape. The fins are clearish to light yellow. With in-line breeding there are now several color varieties. The Pink Convict Cichlid or White Convict Cichlid are pseudo-albino varieties that are pink and cream, and lack the characteristic vertical bars. The coloring of the male is monotone while the female will have an orangish patch on the stomach. All cichlids, along with some saltwater fish such as wrasses and parrotfish, share a common trait of a well-developed pharyngeal set of teeth located in the throat, along with their regular teeth. Cichlids have spiny rays in the back parts of the anal, dorsal, pectoral, and pelvic fins to help discourage predators. The front part of these fins are soft and perfect for precise positions and effortless movements in the water as opposed to fast swimming. Cichlids have one nostril on each side while other fish have 2 sets. To sense “smells” in the water, they suck water in and expel the water right back out after being “sampled” for a short or longer time, depending on how much the cichlid needs to “smell” the water. This feature is shared by saltwater damselfish and cichlids are thought to be closely related. Convict Cichlid are called by its other names like Pink Convict Cichlid, Zebra Cichlid, White Convict Cichlid. The Convict Cichlid has a stocky oval disk shape, with pointed anal and dorsal fins. This is one of the smaller Central American cichlids, with the males only reaching 5 – 6″ (13 -15 cm) in length and females a bit less at 3 – 4″ (8 -10 cm). They are also very deep bodied so it’s easy to underestimate their actual size. They have a general life span of 8 – 10 years, though there have been reports of individuals living up to 20 years. This cichlid has a blue-gray, cream, or blue-lavendar base on the body with 8 to 9 dark vertically running bands. They have a break in the vertical bands in the area behind their head, almost forming a “U” shape. The fins are clearish to light yellow. With in-line breeding there are now several color varieties. The Pink Convict Cichlid or White Convict Cichlid are pseudo-albino varieties that are pink and cream, and lack the characteristic vertical bars. The coloring of the male is monotone while the female will have an orangish patch on the stomach. All cichlids, along with some saltwater fish such as wrasses and parrotfish, share a common trait of a well-developed pharyngeal set of teeth located in the throat, along with their regular teeth. Cichlids have spiny rays in the back parts of the anal, dorsal, pectoral, and pelvic fins to help discourage predators. The front part of these fins are soft and perfect for precise positions and effortless movements in the water as opposed to fast swimming. Cichlids have one nostril on each side while other fish have 2 sets. To sense “smells” in the water, they suck water in and expel the water right back out after being “sampled” for a short or longer time, depending on how much the cichlid needs to “smell” the water. This feature is shared by saltwater damselfish and cichlids are thought to be closely related.
    • The Convict is a very easy fish for a beginner fish keeper to keep and breed. However, these fish are very aggressive and not a good choice for a community tank unless in a very large tank with other robust Central American Cichlids. They are best for beginners to keep in a species only tank.
    • The Convict Cichlid is an omnivorous and a very undemanding eater. It will readily eat a wide variety of foods including: foods manufactured for omnivorous cichlids, vegetable based foods with spirulina, blanched lettuce or other veggies, beef heart and worms. Feed 2 to 5 small pinches of food a day in smaller amounts instead of a large quantity once a day. This will keep the water quality higher over a longer time. All fish benefit from vitamins and supplements added to their foods.
    • The Convict Cichlids are fairly easy to care for provided their water is kept clean. Aquariums are closed systems and regardless of size all need some maintenance. With home aquariums the nitrate and phosphates build up over time and the water hardness increases due to evaporation. Because these fish are very sensitive to pollutants and pH instabilty, so it is important that at least 15- 20% of the tank water is replaced bi-weekly, especially if the tank is densely stocked. When doing the water changes always use a gravel cleaner to ensure all of the decomposing organic matter that has built up is removed. The majority of of problems that occur with tropical fish tanks usually come down to one cause: decomposing organic matter.
    • Convict Cichlids do best when they are allowed plenty of space and a large aquarium. A pair of juveniles can do well in a tank as small as 20 gallons. However, it is recommended that once they become fully grown that they be moved to a tank of around 50 gallons or more. They prefer to have good water movement and efficient filtration. They like a warm tank and can tolerant a wide range of pH, pretty much anywhere from 6.0 to 8.0, though it needs to be kept reasonably consistent. This cichlid has some salt tolerance and can be kept in slightly brackish water conditions. However it is not suited to a full brackish water tank. It can tolerate a salinity that is about 10% of normal a saltwater tank, a specific gravity of less than 1.0002. Provide a sandy substrate with rocks, roots, and pieces of driftwood. They also enjoy plants, especially floating plants to help subdue the light. They will re-arrange the aquarium so make sure substrate plants are anchored down. Normal aquarium lighting works fine if there are floating plants, and low to moderate lighting if no plants.
    • The Convict Cichlid is an aggressive cichlid that can only be kept with similarily sized or larger fish that have the same temperament. The Blue Acara, Rainbow Cichlid, Jack Dempsey and Green Terror. would make suitable tank mates in part because they are similarily aggressive and won’t be terrorized to death by the Convict Cichlid. Do not house this fish with fish that are peaceful, semi-aggressive, or large enough to swallow the Convict Cichlid whole. Once they are mating they will kill anything in the tank if they can. They have been known to beat up large plecostomus and Oscars 3 times larger than themselves. This fish can be kept alone, resulting in a slightly skittish and more mellow fish, or as a male and female pair. They are generally aggressive toward those of the same species especially when mating.
  • Daffodil Cichlid

    • Daffodil Cichlid is also called by its other names like Daffodil Princess Cichlid, Daffodil II, Princess of Zambia. The Daffodil Cichlid is a graceful fish with a body that is elongated with a continuous dorsal fin. The tail fin is lyre shaped and they develop long flowing filaments on all unpaired fins. They reach up to about 4 – 5 inches (10 -13 cm) in length, but can sometimes get a bit bigger in the aquarium reaching up to 6 inches (15 cm). They can live 8 – 10 years with proper care. They have a very pleasing coloration with a light colored tan body washed with hints of yellow and bluish purple spots. The yellow is stronger along the upper portion of the body and onto the dorsal fin, and around the base of the pectoral fin. There are two vertical crescent shaped bars just behind the eye highlighted with a bit of blue. The dorsal fin is lyre shaped and they develop long flowing filaments on all unpaired fins. The fins are tipped with an icy blue. They have brilliant blue eyes.
    • This fish is a great choice for both the beginner and advance aquarist. It is moderately easy to care for as long it has the proper sized aquarium and the right tank mates. They are fairly peaceful, making good inhabitants for the community cichlid tank. They it will adapt to a wide range of water conditions, eat a wide variety of aquarium foods. and will readily breed. The aquarium does need regular water changes.
    • Daffodil Cichlids are omnivorous and feed on swarms of plankton in the water column as well as small crustaceans and invertebrates. In the aquarium they will generally eat all kinds of live, fresh, and flake foods.To keep a good balance give them a high quality flake food or pellet everyday. Regularly supplement these foods with brine shrimp (either live or frozen) or daphnia. Feed 2 to 5 small pinches of food a day in smaller amounts instead of a large quantity once a day. This will keep the water quality higher over a longer time. A one-day-a-week ‘fast’ can also be beneficial. Of course, all fish benefit from added vitamins and supplements to their foods.
    • The Lake Tanganyika cichlids cannot handle large water changes very well unless the new water chemistry closely matches the water they are in. This inability to tolerate large water changes is due to Lake Tanganyika being very deep and the water tends to stay stable. Do normal water changes of only 10% to 20% a week, or more frequent small changes depending on the nitrite/ammonia levels and stocking numbers.
    • The Daffodil Cichlid is active and will swim in all areas of the aquarium. For a species only tank, a minimum of 15 gallons is suggested, though 20 or 35 gallons is better. A larger tank of 50 gallons or more would be required if mixing with other species. They need good water movement along with very strong and efficient filtration. Lake Tanganyika is a very oxygen rich lake so bubblers need to be going day and night, even if there are plants. Regularly check nitrates and ph, nitrates should be no more than 25 ppm and a pH less than 7 is not tolerated. In addition keep an eye on total hardness and carbonate hardness. Avoid overfeeding and overstocking.Lake Tanganyika is the second to largest lake in the world, thus contributing to a low fluctuation in temperature and pH. All Tanganyika cichlids need stable temperatures kept within acceptable limits and lots of oxygen to survive. Temperatures under 72° F and over 86° F for too long is not tolerated by many of these fish. When treating for ich, a few days at 86° F is acceptable. The lake is also consistently alkaline with a pH of around 9, and very hard at about 12 – 14° dGH. In the aquarium most Tanganyika cichlids are fairly adaptable as long as conditions are close to these ideal ranges. Most important is that their water chemistry doesn’t change much over time. The water needs to be well buffered and maintained with small, regular water changes.
    • The Daffodil Cichlid is a fairly non-aggressive community fish. They can be kept in pairs or singly, or in harems that form a group of 6 or more. They can be kept in a smaller species only tank or in a larger aquarium with other durable fish. However they are avid spawners and breeding pairs will establish a territory and defended it together. This fish is also very protective in defending their fry. If kept in a community type environment it is best to introduce the this cichlid last. The tank mates need to be larger with their own established territories. Avoid housing them with the African cichlids from Lake Malawi or Lake Victoria. They may tolerate their own genus, but this is not suggested since hybrids can be formed. They can be housed with robust Lamprologines or a large school of Cyprichromis, like the Sardine Cichlid, Cyprichromis leptosoma. Other good tankmate are some of the Altolamprologus genera such as the White Pearly Calvus, and the compressed cichlids.
  • Demanson’s Cichlid

    • Demanson’s cichlid is also known by its other names like Demasoni Cichlid, Midnight Demasoni. The Demanson’s Cichlid has the typical Mbuna elongated ‘torpedo’ body shape. They only grow to about 2 1/2 to 3 inches (6.4 to 7.6 cm) in length. It is considered to be in the ‘dwarf’ category due to its size. Mbuna cichlids can live up to 10 years with proper care. They have alternating vertical bars that are dark blue, almost black and light blue. There are six dark and five light, starting with a dark stripe behind the gill cover and ending with a muted dark stripe at the base of the tail fin. On their head they have three light blue stripes alternated with the two dark ones. One of these dark stripes is between the eyes and the other one runs across the forehead, where it sort of intersects with the very first vertical bar just behind the gill cover. Their “chin” is a medium blue coloring. On the dorsal fin the stripes angle back with the lighter blue ones being thinner than the dark. The tail fin has very thin “horizontal” lines of dark and light blue and the edge is ‘outlined’ in the light blue and underlined with a dark blue. All cichlids share a common feature that some saltwater fish such as wrasses and parrotfish have. That is a well-developed pharyngeal set of teeth that are in the throat, along with their regular teeth. Cichlids have spiny rays in the back parts of the anal, dorsal, pectoral, and pelvic fins to help discourage predators. The front part of these fins are soft and perfect for precise positions and effortless movements in the water as opposed to fast swimming.
    • This is a great fish for both the intermediate and experienced cichlid keeper. It is an aggressive cichlid, and although it’s smaller then is typical for Mbuna, it is not a community tank specimen that can be kept with fish other than cichlids. The aquarists must be willing to do frequent water changes and provide appropriate tank mates. It is susceptible to Malawi bloat as well as the typical diseases that effect all freshwater fish if the tank is not maintained. In the proper setup it will easily adapt to prepared foods, breed readily, and the juveniles are easy to raise as well.
    • The Demanson’s Cichlid is an omnivorous.that needs mainly herbivorous foods. Their diet should consist of vegetable matter. An all purpose, high quality cichlid formula can be used as a basic diet. Including vegetable supplements to their diet will help with overall health. This food has fiber which keeps their intestinal tract disease free. It is always better to feed them small amounts several times a day instead of one large feeding. This keeps the water quality higher for a longer period of time. Of course, all fish benefit from added vitamins and supplements to their foods. It would not be wise to house this fish with other genus of cichlids that eat beef heart or other mammal meat, as these foods will cause intestinal infections and death.
    • Malawi Cichlids will deteriorate under poor water conditions. Along with an established filtration system; doing water changes of 30% a week (up to 50% with a crowded system) is needed for their health. Malawi bloat is a typical disease especially if their dietary needs are not met with quality foods. It is caused by too much protein matter.
    • The streams that flow into Lake Malawi have a high mineral content. This along with evaporation has resulted in alkaline water that is highly mineralized. Lake Malawi is known for its clarity and stability as far as pH and other water chemistries. It is easy to see why it is important to watch tank parameters with all Lake Malawi fish.Rift lake cichlids need hard alkaline water but are not found in brackish waters. Salt is sometimes used as a buffering agent to increase the water’s carbonate hardness. This cichlid has some salt tolerance so can be kept in slightly brackish water conditions. However it not suited to a full brackish water tank. It can tolerate a salinity that is about 10% of a normal saltwater tank, a specific gravity of less than 1.0002. 40 gallon tank will work for a single fish, but 100 gallons or more will be needed for a group or a mixed mbuna tank. The Demanson’s Cichlid should always be house in numbers of 12 or more to help alleviate extreme aggression by the dominant male towards females or others. They do fine in either freshwater or brackish freshwater but need good water movement along with very strong and efficient filtration.
    • The Demanson’s Cichlid is aggressive and is not considered to be a community fish. In fact, it should only be housed with other aggressive Mbunas. Only keep them in a community Mbuna designed tank with lots of rock structures. They are very territorial, even a 1/2 inch male will chase away a medium size fish from his territory. Do not house them with ANY fish that has the same hue or other fish that have bars, including a yellow with dark bars. Do not house with similarly colored species, especially species like the Dogtooth Cichlid Cynotilapia afra or Kenyi Cichlid. Maylandia lombardoi. You can house them with a yellow Mbuna that does not have bars and they will be fine. Some examples of appropriate tank mates are a yellow species of Electric Yellow Labidochromis caeruleus, Red Zebra Maylandia estherae, and the Cobalt Zebra Maylandia callainos. This fish is best kept in a group of 12 or more. The male to female ratio can vary, but there should be more than one male. You may need to experiment with your fish’s temperament to determine how many males you can keep. In the wild they live in large groups, but the reason for the large grouping in a captive environment is that this larger number will prevent the dominant male from focusing his aggression on just a few fish, thus leading to their death. With a large number, the subdominant females and males are ‘lost in the crowd’. If the numbers are too low, such as 5 or 6, a male will systematically kill the others until he is alone. There will be a dominant male in the group, and once he has established himself, the other Demanson’s Cichlids will avoid fighting with him. If you cannot provide the needed room, it is best to leave this one at the store.
  • Diamond Tetra

    • Diamond Tetra is also called by other names such as Pittier’s Tetra, Diamond Characin.
    • They grow up to 2.4 inches and have a life span of 3-6 years depending upon care and maintenance. this fish is extremely good choice for any beginner hobbyist as it is very robyist and tolerant to wild variety of water condition, it’s a very hardy fish and on account of their exception active nature they are not appropriate choice and tank mates for passive and shy inhabitants as they are constantly on the move and can harass others in the tank which could cause problem in shy varieties of tank mates.
    • They are omnivorous and would eat anything that they are fed twice or thrice a day.
    • Partial water change  of 25-50% every week would be recommended if the tank is not densely stocked.
    • It would be appropriate to have school of 5 or more Diamond Tetra in a minimum of 15 gallon aquarium. in case of Diamond Tetra more fishes would make them more comfortable. the filtration system needs to be a high quality without creating much water turbulence as these fishes prefer slow water movement.
    • it would be appropriate to keep smaller size fish or larger size fish in the community tank along with Diamond Tetra as small fishes may become target of their fin nipping habits and stressed. these fishes are skilled jumpers it would therefore be necessary to secure the aquarium by covering it.
    • The good compatible tank mates are similar size tetras rainbow fish, larger rasboras, barbs and some dwarf cichlid, danios since they are hardy fish in a well maintained aquarium their health would not be of any issue.
  • Electric Blue Hap

    • Electric Blue Hap is also known by its other names like Electric Blue, Hap Ahli.
    • They can reach up to about 6 inches in length, and grower even bigger in the aquarium.
    • These Cichlids from Lake Malawi have a life span of over 7 years.   With proper upkeep and maintenance they can live well beyond 10 years too.
    • The males species electric blue reflect variations and generally have have 9 to 12 dark vertical bars on their body. They all have yellow, orange or red in the anal fin. Females of this variety have silver coloration, but mature females can at times have hints of light blue.
    • This cichlid has some salt tolerance, therefore can be kept in slightly brackish water conditions but not suited to a full brackish water tank.
    • These cichlids are a good option for the beginners and can also be desirable for more experienced aquarist and Cichlids keepers.
    • Since they are aggressive cichlids and hence are not recommended for community tanks.  The Electric Blue Hap is not considered to be a community fish but can be housed with other Haplochromis and peaceful Mbuna. It is recommended not to house these with ]with male and female Aulonocara (Peacock Cichlids). They will kill the male Peacocks and mate with the females. It is advidsable to keep them in groups of one male and 4 or more females. Larger tanks with 6 feet or more in length or so, can make things a little less stressful. In case of overstocking is used as a form or tool of aggression reduction then care should be taken to do several partial water changes a week, as Bio Load would affect the water parameters.
    • This Malawi Cichlids will not do too well under poor water conditions. It is therefore recommended to do frequent water changes.  In the proper setup they will easily adapt to prepared foods and breed readily.  Partial water changes upto 20% a week will be required to be carried out depending on bio load to maintain healthy aquatic conditions.
    • These fishes are primarily carnivorous.  They will eat any fish small enough to be consumed. They are required to be fed quality cichlid pellet, supplemented with frozen krill or brine shrimp.  They should be fed 5-6 times a day in smaller quantities.  They need not be fed everyday, as they have a tendency to overeat and this can contribute to Malawi bloat.
    • It is recommended to have minimum tank size is 55 gallons to house these Cichlids.
    • The filtration system has to be very efficient with strong water movement.
    • Please visit again to check for the available stock and for size of the fish. Presently this fish is Out Of Stock.
  • Electric Blue Jack Dempsey Cichlid

    • Electric Blue are called by its other names like Electric Blue Dempsey, Blue Dempsey, Neon Blue Dempsey.Just like its parentage, the body of the Electric Blue Jack Dempsey is stocky and compact. However this variety is a little smaller reaching closer to the 8 inches (20 cm) in length, rather than the almost 10 inches (25 cm) of a full size Jack Dempsey fish. They generally have a life span of 10 – 15 years.This beautiful variant exhibits a coloration comprised of mostly ‘blues’ rather than the ‘greens’ seen on the normal Dempsey cichlid. They have a dark brown background contrasted with brilliant metallic and iridescent blue flecks. Males develop long pointed dorsal and anal fins and may also have a round black spot in the center of the body and at the base of the tail. Juveniles are less brilliant, having a white to light tan background with faint turquoise to blue flecks that get bolder with age. If stressed or moody these fish can exhibit great color change in the aquarium, and also with age. Stressed fish will be lighter and their spots will be less striking.
    • The Blue Dempsey is an easy fish to care for and a great Cichlid starter fish for beginners. They are not overly demanding when it comes to water conditions and will take a variety of commercially prepared foods.
    • Since they are omnivorous the Electric Blue Jack Dempsey will generally eat all kinds of live, fresh, and flake or pelleted foods. They get quite large so they should be fed a high quality pelleted food and large chunk foods such as meat or fish.
    • The Electric Blue Jack Dempsey is fairly easy to care for provided its water is kept clean. Aquariums are closed systems and regardless of size all need some maintenance. With home aquariums the nitrate and phosphates build up over time and the water hardness increases due to evaporation. Because these fish are very sensitive to pollutants and pH instabilty, it is important that at least 15- 20% of the tank water should be replaced bi-weekly, especially if the tank is densely stocked. When performing the water changes always use a gravel cleaner to make sure all of the decomposing organic matter that has built up is removed. The majority of of problems that occur with tropical fish tanks usually come down to one cause, decomposing organic matter.
    • A minimum 40 gallon aquarium is suggested, though a larger tank would be suggested if keeping them in a semi-aggressive community tank with other like sized fish. They need good water movement along with strong and efficient filtration.Although Dempsey’s can tolerate a fairly wide range of conditions, it has been suggested that warmer temperatures lead to more aggression in this fish. Many aquarists will keep the maximum aquarium temperature below 78° F (26° C) to help reduce antagonism. Provide a bottom of fine sand and plenty of hiding places among rocks and wood. Plants are appreciated but should be hardy, such as Sagittaria. Place the plants around the inside perimeter leaving an open area in the center for swimming. The plants should be potted to protect the roots. The Electric Blue Jack Dempsey is a rewarding specimen for the aquarist as it is moderately easy to keep as long as the aquarium is maintained.
    • Though the aggressively territorial Jack Dempsey is not considered a good community fish due to their proclivity to defend their territory, the Electric Blue Jack Dempsey has demonstrated a much more tolerant attitude towards tankmates. That being said, as this fish ages it can tend to become more territorial and aggressive, especially when it is time for them to spawn. If they become too aggressive to cohabitat with the other members of the tank, it is recommended they be transfered to a species only tank. If keeping more than one, it is easier and safer for them to keep them in large groups rather than in pairs. The author has successfully kept an adult Electric Blue Jack Dempsey with a 12″ Peacock Eel, a 10″ Chocolate Plecostomus, and a 4″ Upside-down Catfish for several years. They get along very well.
  • Electric Blue Johannii

    • Electric Blue Johannii is also known by other names like Johanni Cichlid, Blue Johanni, Bluegray Mbuna, Blue Mbuna.
    • They can grow just under 3 inches in length in the wild, but can get a bit bigger in the aquarium reaching about 4 inches.
    • They can live up to to around 12 years.
    • The coloration is completely different between male and female. The males have light blue with a dark blue to black horizontal band that runs across the back, and often broken up with spots of light blue. There is also a medium shade of blue that runs through the middle of the body horizontally. This mid band periodically seems to “merge into the area above and below, almost causing a checkered pattern. The female and juveniles are generally golden-orange coloring with the female having an indistinct dark horizontal band that runs the length of the body, starting in an area behind the eyes. Due to similarity in coloration, males are often mistaken for their close relative Melanochromis cyaneorhabdos.
    • This Cichlids is definitely not recommended for Beginners. However, choice of this fish might be good for an intermediate and an experienced Cichlid keeper.
    • It is moderately aggressive cichlid, and again like most Cichlids are not a community tank specimen.  They can, however, be kept with cichlids.
    • These fishes are omnivorous in nature it will accept any type of food like frozen or live brine shrimp, high quality flake, pellets and other preparations meant for Cichlids with an exception of a popular food like beef heart are to be avoided as they can promote digestive problems.  It is advisable to feed them small quantity several times a day instead of one large feeding.
    • This cichlid has some salt tolerance, therefore can be kept in slightly brackish water conditions but not suited to a full brackish water tank.
    • The filtration system has to be very efficient with strong water movement.
    • The colour of these Malawi Cichlids will become pale and deteriorate under poor water conditions.  These are messy fish and it is recommended to carry out partial water changes to an extent of 50% a week depending on bio load. If overstocking is used as a form of aggression reduction, care should be taken to do several partial water changes a week.
    •  For these Cichlids 30 to 40 gallon tank or an aquarium is recommended.  When mixing these Cichlids with other Cichlids, a larger tank of minimum 100 gallons or more would be recommended.
    • It is recommended that one male with several females should be kept in an aquarium, unless the size of the Aquarium is large enough to diffuse the aggression of other tank mates.
    • These Johanni Cichlid are semi-aggressive cichlid but is, thus, not considered to be a good community fish. It is advisable to keep these in a species specific tank rather than mixing the other species, keeping in groups of one male and several females. They are comparatively less aggressive than other Melanochromis species.  These Cichlids reflect  aggressive behavior when they are around similar looking males of a different species. They can be kept with other less aggressive cichlids from Lake Malawi that are not similar in coloring / shape. Tank mates can also include Cichlids like the Cobalt Zebra, Red Empress, African Butterfly Peacock, Pseudotropheus lombardoi, and the Lemon Cichlid. They can also be housed with the Cuckoo catfish. It is not advisable to keep them with other Melanochromis as they will tend to attack or interbreed, which is not a good idea.
    • Please visit again to check for the available stock and for size of the fish. Presently this fish is Out Of Stock.

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